My Blog

Posts for: March, 2018

By P Steven Wainess DDS
March 19, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: Root Canal  

Are you suffering from severe pain?root canal

Contrary to common belief, root canals are not painful. Root Canals relieve pain, just ask your St. Clair Shores, MI, dentist, Dr. P Steven Wainess.

What are the different tooth layers?

A tooth is composed of several layers:

  • The outermost layer is enamel; it's the strong and white part of the tooth.
  • The second layer is dentin; it's yellowish and a bit softer.
  • The third layer is the pulp; it consists of blood vessels and nerves.
  • The last layer is cementum; it anchors the whole tooth to the jawbone.

What's a root canal?

When a cavity is deep enough to infiltrate the enamel and the dentin, it ultimately reaches the pulp, which sometimes leads to excruciating pain.

Your St. Clair Shores dentist will then need to remove the pulp, clean and disinfect the canal from any bacteria remaining then seal the canal to prevent any more bacteria from entering and flourishing again.

Why would I need a root canal?

Poor dental hygiene is a main player when it comes to needing a root canal. If you don't brush your teeth twice a day and floss at the very least once, you will suffer from plaque and tartar building up.

Plaque and tartar are not only difficult to clean at some point, but the bacteria will eat away at your teeth wreaking havoc on your teeth and reaching the pulp.

How can I prevent a root canal?

Brushing and flossing aren't the only things you need to take into consideration. Eating sugary foods and drinks like candies and soda contribute to this issue. Healthy foods like apples and constantly drinking water will help remove plaque and food debris from your teeth.

If you have any questions or concerns about root canals, don't hesitate to call your St. Clair Shores, MI, dentist. You can also schedule an appointment at this number: (586) 293-1515.


By P Steven Wainess DDS
March 17, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral hygiene   flossing  
RegularFlossingnotYourThingTryanOralIrrigator

One of the keys to a healthy mouth is daily oral hygiene. These tasks have one objective: remove plaque, a thin film of bacteria and leftover food particles, from tooth surfaces. Plaque fosters bacterial growth that can cause diseases like tooth decay or periodontal (gum) disease.

Brushing does an effective job removing plaque from the broad surfaces of teeth. But because plaque can also grow between teeth where your brush can’t reach, you also need to floss.

Unfortunately, flossing is a lot of people’s least favorite hygiene task. It can be time-consuming and requires a little more dexterity than brushing. As a result, it’s common for people to brush but not floss — and potentially miss plaque that could trigger dental disease.

There is an easier alternative to traditional string flossing: an oral irrigator. These countertop appliances deliver a stream of pulsating water at high pressure through a handheld device that looks similar to a power toothbrush. The user directs the water stream through the nozzle tip (which comes in various sizes) between the teeth. The water vibrates plaque loose and then rinses it away.

Besides people with limited dexterity, water flossers are also ideal for individuals wearing braces or other orthodontic hardware. Because of the metal hardware on and around teeth, flossing can be an arduous task. An oral irrigator makes it easier to floss and reduce plaque buildup, a perennial problem for orthodontic patients. In fact, one study of orthodontic patients found that using an irrigator with a tip especially designed for braces removed five times as much plaque as patients using only a manual toothbrush.

Of course, anyone can use an oral irrigator as an alternative to traditional flossing. Your dentist and staff can advise you on what to look for in equipment and provide instruction on how to use it. If traditional flossing isn’t your thing, consider an oral irrigator to get rid of plaque and keep your teeth and gums healthy and attractive.

If you would like more information on oral irrigation to remove daily plaque, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Cleaning between Your Teeth: How Water Flossing can help.”


By P Steven Wainess DDS
March 02, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: medicine  
WhytheOintmentYoureUsingCouldbeMakingYourFacialRashWorse

The red, scaly rash suddenly appearing on your face doesn’t cause you much physical discomfort, but it’s still embarrassing. And to make matters worse treating it as you would other skin ailments seems to make it worse.

Your ailment might be a particular skin condition known as peri-oral dermatitis. Although its overall occurrence is fairly low (1% or less of the population worldwide) it seems to be more prevalent in industrialized countries like the United States, predominantly among women ages 20-45.

Peri-oral dermatitis can appear on the skin as a rash of small red bumps, pimples or blisters. You usually don’t feel anything but some patients can have occasional stinging, itching or burning sensations. It’s often misidentified as other types of skin rashes, which can be an issue when it comes to treatment.

Steroid-based ointments that work well with other skin ailments could have the opposite effect with peri-oral dermatitis. If you’re using that kind of cream out of your medicine cabinet, your rash may look better initially because the steroid constricts the tiny blood vessels in the skin. But the reduction in redness won’t last as the steroid tends to suppress the skin’s natural healing capacity with continued use.

The best treatment for peri-oral dermatitis is to first stop using any topical steroid ointments, including other-the-counter hydrocortisone, and any other medications, lotions or creams on it. Instead, wash your skin with a mild soap. Although the rash may flare up initially, it should begin to subside after a few days.

A physician can further treat it with antibiotic lotions typically containing Clindamycin or Metronidazole, or a non-prescription, anti-itch lotion for a less severe case. For many this clears up the condition long-term, but there’s always the possibility of relapse. A repeat of this treatment is usually effective.

Tell your dentist if you have recurring bouts of a rash that match these descriptions. More than likely you’ll be referred to a dermatologist for treatment. With the right attention—and avoiding the wrong treatment ointment—you’ll be able to say goodbye to this annoying and embarrassing rash.

If you would like more information on peri-oral dermatitis, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.